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Investors going for broke in East Africa social enterprise

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Social enterprise is the new buzz in East Africa. Left, Eco Fuel employees package their products, and a Wana employee delivers gas on his motorcycle. Photos/FILE

Social enterprise is the new buzz in East Africa. Left, Eco Fuel employees package their products, and a Wana employee delivers gas on his motorcycle. Photos/FILE 

By Julius Barigaba The EastAfrican

posted  Wednesday, May 14  2014 at  14:12

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  • Unreasonable East Africa, an organisation that helps young people to adapt the world to their environment in order to improve it, will from June 25 to July 31, host 24 social entrepreneurs, who run 14 ventures in Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania, at the Unreasonable Institute in Kampala.

Jibu gives its affiliate entrepreneurs tools that include advanced water filtration systems, refillable bottles, packaging material, points of sales and branding to sell clean water.

From its businesses, Jibu has generated $9,000 with their business-in-a-box model. They encourage entrepreneurs to reduce prices for the bottom 10 per cent of the market through subsidies funded by donors and carbon credits. 

John Businge and Robert Makune
Forever Sanitation Ltd, Uganda

Forever Sanitation provides sewerage services where there are none — in the slums of Kampala. The company uses unique equipment to empty pit latrines in low-income residential areas that are not accessible by the city’s waste removal vehicles.

The business has created a healthier environment for 250 households in Kampala, and generated about $10,000 in revenue. 

Emmy Wasirwa and Bernard Mogaka Kinara
Wana Energy Solutions, Uganda

Wana Energy sells affordable gas for homes and businesses, which comes with delivery, installation and safety training. The gas is cleaner, cheaper and more environmentally friendly than charcoal and firewood.

Since 2008, Wana has made over $1.65 million by building a customer base of more than 4,000 households who, on average, save about 25 per cent on cooking fuel costs.

Vincent Kienzler and David Gerard
Green Bio Energy, Uganda

Besides consultancy and training in micro-entrepreneurship and briquette production, Green Bio also sells fuel-efficient stoves, solar lamps and carbonised biomass briquettes, the cheaper and ecofriendly alternative to traditional charcoal.

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